Understanding Gregory Bateson Mind Beauty And The Sacred Earth Suny Series In Environmental Philosophy And Ethics Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Understanding Gregory Bateson
Author: Noel G. Charlton
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 0791478270
Pages: 292
Year: 2010-03-25
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Introduction to Gregory Bateson’s unique perspective on the relationship of humanity to the natural world.
A Recursive Vision
Author: Peter Harries-Jones
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 0802075916
Pages: 358
Year: 1995
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Gregory Bateson was one of the most original social scientists of this century. He is widely known as author of key ideas used in family therapy - including the well-known condition called 'double bind' . He was also one of the most influential figures in cultural anthropology. In the decade before his death in 1980 Bateson turned toward a consideration of ecology. Standard ecology concentrates on an ecosystem's biomass and on energy budgets supporting life. Bateson came to the conclusion that understanding ecological organization requires a complete switch in scientific perspective. He reasoned that ecological phenomena must be explained primarily through patterns of information and that only through perceiving these informational patterns will we uncover the elusive unity, or integration, of ecosystems. Bateson believed that relying upon the materialist framework of knowledge dominant in ecological science will deepen errors of interpretation and, in the end, promote eco-crisis. He saw recursive patterns of communication as the basis of order in both natural and human domains. He conducted his investigation first in small-scale social settings; then among octopus, otters, and dolphins. Later he took these investigations to the broader setting of evolutionary analysis and developed a framework of thinking he called 'an ecology of mind.' Finally, his inquiry included an ecology of mind in ecological settings - a recursive epistemology. This is the first study of the whole range of Bateson's ecological thought - a comprehensive presentaionof Bateson's matrix of ideas. Drawing on unpublished letters and papers, Harries-Jones clarifies themes scattered throughout Bateson's own writings, revealing the conceptual consistency inherent in Bateson's position, and elaborating ways in which he pioneered aspects of late twentieth-century thought.
Runaway
Author: Anthony Chaney
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469631741
Pages: 320
Year: 2017-08-09
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The anthropologist Gregory Bateson has been called a lost giant of twentieth-century thought. In the years following World War II, Bateson was among the group of mathematicians, engineers, and social scientists who laid the theoretical foundations of the information age. In Palo Alto in 1956, he introduced the double-bind theory of schizophrenia. By the sixties, he was in Hawaii studying dolphin communication. Bateson's discipline hopping made established experts wary, but he found an audience open to his ideas in a generation of rebellious youth. To a gathering of counterculturalists and revolutionaries in 1967 London, Bateson was the first to warn of a "greenhouse effect" that could lead to runaway climate change. Blending intellectual biography with an ambitious reappraisal of the 1960s, Anthony Chaney uses Bateson's life and work to explore the idea that a postmodern ecological consciousness is the true legacy of the decade. Surrounded by voices calling for liberation of all kinds, Bateson spoke of limitation and dependence. But he also offered an affirming new picture of human beings and their place in the world—as ecologies knit together in a fabric of meaning that, said Bateson, "we might as well call Mind."
Upside-Down Gods
Author: Peter Harries-Jones
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0823270343
Pages: 296
Year: 2016-05-02
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"Science's conventional understanding of environment as an inert material resource underlies our unwillingness to acknowledge the military-industrial role in ongoing ecological catastrophes. In a crucial challenge to modern science's exclusive attachment to materialist premises, Bateson reframed culture, psychology, biology, and evolution in terms of feedback and communication, fundamentally altering perception of our relationship with nature. This intellectual biography covers the whole trajectory of Bateson's career, from his first anthropological work alongside Margaret Mead through the continuing relevance of his late forays into biosemiotics. Harries-Jones shows how the sum of Bateson's thinking across numerous fields turns our notions of causality upside down, providing a moral divide between sustainable creativity and our current biocide."
Gregory Bateson
Author: Gregory Bateson
Publisher: Cybernetics & Human Knowing
ISBN: 1845400321
Pages: 182
Year: 2005
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Gregory Bateson's work, intensely interdisciplinary, even transdisciplinary, in character, continues to touch others in fields as diverse as communication and ecology, anthropology and philosophy, family therapy and education, and mental and spiritual health. Bateson's cybernetic epistemology forges a path of connection. The authors in this volume celebrate the Bateson Centennial, with contributions rooted in Bateson's ideas and ideals. Although their homes lie in different intellectual realms, their work embodies Bateson's interdisciplinary character. These essays offer both personal stories of Bateson's influence, while at the same time demonstrating opportunities for its extension, and can be read as a gift to a creative spirit on his 100th birthday.
Steps to an Ecology of Mind
Author: Gregory Bateson
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226039056
Pages: 533
Year: 1972
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Gregory Bateson was a philosopher, anthropologist, photographer, naturalist, and poet, as well as the husband and collaborator of Margaret Mead. This classic anthology of his major work includes a new Foreword by his daughter, Mary Katherine Bateson. 5 line drawings.
Mountains, Rivers, and the Great Earth
Author: Jason M. Wirth
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 1438465432
Pages: 173
Year: 2017-06-05
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Engages the global ecological crisis through a radical rethinking of what it means to inhabit the earth. Meditating on the work of American poet and environmental activist Gary Snyder and thirteenth-century Japanese Zen Master Eihei Dōgen, Jason M. Wirth draws out insights for understanding our relation to the planet’s ongoing ecological crisis. He discusses what Dōgen calls “the Great Earth” and what Snyder calls “the Wild” as being comprised of the play of waters and mountains, emptiness and form, and then considers how these ideas can illuminate the spiritual and ethical dimensions of place. The book culminates in a discussion of earth democracy, a place-based sense of communion where all beings are interconnected and all beings matter. This radical rethinking of what it means to inhabit the earth will inspire lovers of Snyder’s poetry, Zen practitioners, environmental philosophers, and anyone concerned about the global ecological crisis. “There are numerous books that discuss Snyder’s ecological view and, to a lesser extent, his relation to Dōgen. There are also many books on Buddhism and ecology. But this book is unique in its focus and format and its authorial voice. It’s a distinctive, ambitious, and timely work.” — David Landis Barnhill, translator of Bashō’s Journey: The Literary Prose of Matsuo Bashō “This is a very interesting book on, arguably, the most crucial topic that we are facing today. It makes us realize how deep we are in the ecological crisis, and that this crisis is not merely a crisis outside of us, but lies first and foremost deeply in ourselves. An incredibly timely and important book—I could not stop reading it and thinking about it.” — Gerard Kuperus, author of Ecopolitical Homelessness: Defining Place in an Unsettled World
Contemporary Studies in Environmental and Indigenous Pedagogies
Author: Andrejs Kulnieks, Dan Roronhiakewen Longboat, Young Young
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9462092931
Pages: 314
Year: 2013-06-13
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Contemporary Studies in Environmental and Indigenous Pedagogies: A Curricula of Stories and Place. Our book is a compilation of the work of experienced educational researchers and practitioners, all of whom currently work in educational settings across North America. Contributors bring to this discussion, an enriched view of diverse ecological perspectives regarding when and how contemporary environmental and Indigenous curriculum figures into the experiences of curricular theories and practices. This work brings together theorists that inform a cultural ecological analysis of the environmental crisis by exploring the ways in which language informs ways of knowing and being as they outline how metaphor plays a major role in human relationships with natural and reconstructed environments. This book will be of interest to educational researchers and practitioners who will find the text important for envisioning education as an endeavour that situates learning in relation to and informed by an Indigenous Environmental Studies and Eco-justice Education frameworks. This integrated collection of theory and practice of environmental and Indigenous education is an essential tool for researchers, graduate and undergraduate students in faculties of education, environmental studies, social studies, multicultural education, curriculum theory and methods, global and comparative education, and women’s studies. Moreover, this work documents methods of developing ways of implementing Indigenous and Environmental Studies in classrooms and local communities through a framework that espouses an eco-ethical consciousness. The proposed book is unique in that it offers a wide variety of perspectives, inviting the reader to engage in a broader conversation about the multiple dimensions of the relationship between ecology, language, culture, and education in relation to the cultural roots of the environmental crisis that brings into focus the local and global commons, language and identity, and environmental justice through pedagogical approaches by faculty across North America who are actively teaching and researching in this burgeoning field.
Philosophy, Children, and the Family
Author: Albert C. Cafagna, Richard T. Peterson, Craig A. Staudenbaur
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 146133473X
Pages: 392
Year: 2012-12-06
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The United Nations' designation of 1979 as the International Year of the Child marked the first global effort undertaken to heighten awareness of the special needs of children. Activities initiated during this special year were designed to promote purposive and collaborative actions for the benefit of children throughout the world. Michigan State University's celebration of the International Year of the Child was held from Septem ber 1979 through June 1980. A variety of activities focused attention on the multiplicity of factors affecting the welfare of today's children as well as the children of the future. Many people involved with the university were concerned that benefits to children continue beyond the official time allocated to the celebration. The series Child Nurturance is one response to this concern. The first five volumes of Child Nurturance reflect directly the activities held on the Michigan State University campus and consist of original contributions from guest speakers and invited contributors. Subsequent biennial volumes will present original contributions from individuals representing such fields as anthropology, biology, education, human ecology, psychology, philosophy, sociology, and medicine. We hope the material presented in these volumes will promote greater understanding of children and encourage interdisciplinary inquiry into the individual, family, societal and cultural variables which influence their welfare and development. We would . like to express both our thanks and our admiration for who not only typed the camera-ready copy for each of Margaret Burritt the volumes, but also served as general manager of the entire project.
The Truth of Ecology
Author: Dana Phillips
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0195137698
Pages: 300
Year: 2003
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A wide-ranging appraisal of environmental thought. It explores such topics as the history of ecology, radical science studies and ecology, the need for greater theoretical sophistication in ecocriticism, the dubious legacy of Thoreau, and the contradictions of contemporary nature writing.
The Value of Culture
Author: Arjo Klamer
Publisher: Amsterdam University Press
ISBN: 9053562184
Pages: 243
Year: 1996
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Culture manifests itself in everything human, including the ordinary business of everyday life. Culture and art have their own value, but economic values are also constrained. Art sponsorships and subsidies suggest a value that exceeds market price. So what is the real value of culture? Unlike the usual focus on formal problems, which has 'de-cultured' and 'de-moralized' the practice of economics, this book brings together economists, philosophers, historians, political scientists and artists to try to sort out the value of culture. This is a book not only for economists and social scientists, but also for anybody actively involved in the world of the arts and culture.
Deep Ecology for the Twenty-first Century
Author: George Sessions
Publisher: Shambhala Publications
ISBN:
Pages: 488
Year: 1995-01
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Join the Super Friends as they unite against the bad guys and stand up for justice in this action-packed colouring book!
Understanding Media Theory
Author: Arjen Mulder
Publisher: V2_ publishing
ISBN: 9056623885
Pages: 217
Year: 2004
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Among students at universities and colleges of higher education, as well as in the written press, one can ascertain a growing interest in media theory. The main thrust of this methodology is the analysis of how a society is altered by the technical characteristics of the various media it encompasses. It examines popular culture as well as the arts, journalism as well as philosophy, scientific as well as general insights, mass media as well as individualized media. Today, there is a conveyor belt of books about new media, but what seems to be missing is knowledge and understanding of the classical media theories of Ernst Cassirer, Susanne Langer, Harold Innis, Marshall McLuhan, Claude Shannon, Gregory Bateson, Vilem Flusser, Friedrich Kittler, and many others. In "Understanding Media Theory, the ideas of these theoreticians and philosophers are explained and applied in a clear and accessible way--not by discussing the writers one by one, but by using real examples and analyzing them on the basis of concepts developed in media theory. Consequently, this volume is accessible to a broad public, though it is primarily intended for students and teachers of media studies.
The Indispensable Excess of the Aesthetic
Author: Katya Mandoki
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498503071
Pages: 264
Year: 2015-07-15
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This book offers a compelling account of the evolution of sensibility, weaving together Darwinian and biosemiotic theory. It works along non-anthropomorphic aesthetics of the appreciation and creation of beauty in nature as an end in itself which has practical benefit.
Integral Ecology
Author: Sean Esbjorn-Hargens, Ph.D., Michael E. Zimmerman, Ph.D.
Publisher: Shambhala Publications
ISBN: 0834824469
Pages: 832
Year: 2011-03-08
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Today there is a bewildering diversity of views on ecology and the natural environment. With more than two hundred distinct and valuable perspectives on the natural world—and with scientists, economists, ethicists, activists, philosophers, and others often taking completely different stances on the issues—how can we come to agreement to solve our toughest environmental problems? In response to this pressing need, Integral Ecology unites valuable insights from multiple perspectives into a comprehensive theoretical framework—one that can be put to use right now. The framework is based on Integral Theory, as well as Ken Wilber’s AQAL model, and is the result of over a decade of research exploring the myriad perspectives on ecology available to us today and their respective methodologies. Dozens of real-life applications and examples of this framework currently in use are examined, including three in-depth case studies: work with marine fisheries in Hawai’i, strategies of eco-activists to protect Canada’s Great Bear Rainforest, and a study of community development in El Salvador. In addition, eighteen personal practices of transformation are provided for you to increase your own integral ecological awareness. Integral Ecology provides the most sophisticated application and extension of Integral Theory available today, and as such it serves as a template for any truly integral effort.