The Last Resort A Zimbabwe Memoir Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

The Last Resort
Author: Douglas Rogers
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0307407985
Pages: 317
Year: 2010
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An award-winning journalist traces the story of his family's game farm in war-torn Zimbabwe, where his parents were forced to take increasingly extreme measures to stay alive against the forces of the Mugabe regime and their land-reclamation efforts. Reprint. A best-selling book.
The Last Resort
Author: Douglas Rogers
Publisher: Crown
ISBN: 0307459845
Pages: 320
Year: 2009-09-22
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Thrilling, heartbreaking, and, at times, absurdly funny, The Last Resort is a remarkable true story about one family in a country under siege and a testament to the love, perseverance, and resilience of the human spirit. Born and raised in Zimbabwe, Douglas Rogers is the son of white farmers living through that country’s long and tense transition from postcolonial rule. He escaped the dull future mapped out for him by his parents for one of adventure and excitement in Europe and the United States. But when Zimbabwe’s president Robert Mugabe launched his violent program to reclaim white-owned land and Rogers’s parents were caught in the cross fire, everything changed. Lyn and Ros, the owners of Drifters–a famous game farm and backpacker lodge in the eastern mountains that was one of the most popular budget resorts in the country–found their home and resort under siege, their friends and neighbors expelled, and their lives in danger. But instead of leaving, as their son pleads with them to do, they haul out a shotgun and decide to stay. On returning to the country of his birth, Rogers finds his once orderly and progressive home transformed into something resembling a Marx Brothers romp crossed with Heart of Darkness: pot has supplanted maize in the fields; hookers have replaced college kids as guests; and soldiers, spies, and teenage diamond dealers guzzle beer at the bar. And yet, in spite of it all, Rogers’s parents–with the help of friends, farmworkers, lodge guests, and residents–among them black political dissidents and white refugee farmers–continue to hold on. But can they survive to the end? In the midst of a nation stuck between its stubborn past and an impatient future, Rogers soon begins to see his parents in a new light: unbowed, with passions and purpose renewed, even heroic. And, in the process, he learns that the "big story" he had relentlessly pursued his entire adult life as a roving journalist and travel writer was actually happening in his own backyard. Evoking elements of The Tender Bar and Absurdistan, The Last Resort is an inspiring, coming-of-age tale about home, love, hope, responsibility, and redemption. An edgy, roller-coaster adventure, it is also a deeply moving story about how to survive a corrupt Third World dictatorship with a little innovation, humor, bribery, and brothel management. From the Hardcover edition.
The Last Resort
Author: Douglas Rogers
Publisher: Short Books
ISBN: 1907595112
Pages: 356
Year: 2011-01-01
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WINNER, BEST TRAVEL BOOK 2010 - BRITISH GUILD OF TRAVEL WRITERS "A memoir that is both funny and deeply moving... Rogers' compassion, humour and frequent bemusement give this heart-stoppingly good book its life force." The Times In The Last Resort, journalist Douglas Rogers tells the eye-opening, harrowing and, at times, surprisingly funny story of his parents' struggle for survival in war-torn Zimbabwe. For many years, Lyn and Ros Rogers were the owners of Drifters, a famous game farm and backpacker lodge in the eastern mountains. But when President Robert Mugabe launched his violent land reclamation programme, everything changed. The Rogers found their home under siege, their friends and neighbours expelled, and their lives in danger. But instead of leaving, as their son pleaded with them to do, they hauled out a shotgun and stayed. Soon afterwards, Douglas returns to find the country of his birth in chaos, and his home transformed into something between a Marx Brothers romp and the Heart of Darkness: marijuana has supplanted maize in the fields; hookers have replaced gap-year kids as guests; soldiers, spies and teenage diamond dealers down beers at the bar. Beyond the farm gates, armed war veterans loyal to Mugabe circle like hungry lions. And yet, in spite of it all, the Rogers - with the help of friends and locals, black political dissidents among them - hold on. And Douglas begins to see his parents in a new light: unbowed, even heroic. In the process he learns that the "big story" he had pursued throughout his adult life was actually happening in his own backyard. The Last Resort is an inspiring, edgy roller-coaster adventure, but also a deeply moving testament to the love and loyalty inspired by Zimbabwe and her people.
When a Crocodile Eats the Sun
Author: Peter Godwin
Publisher: Back Bay Books
ISBN: 0316032093
Pages: 368
Year: 2008-04-10
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After his father's heart attack in 1984, Peter Godwin began a series of pilgrimages back to Zimbabwe, the land of his birth, from Manhattan, where he now lives. On these frequent visits to check on his elderly parents, he bore witness to Zimbabwe's dramatic spiral downwards into the jaws of violent chaos, presided over by an increasingly enraged dictator. And yet long after their comfortable lifestyle had been shattered and millions were fleeing, his parents refuse to leave, steadfast in their allegiance to the failed state that has been their adopted home for 50 years. Then Godwin discovered a shocking family secret that helped explain their loyalty. Africa was his father's sanctuary from another identity, another world. WHEN A CROCODILE EATS THE SUN is a stirring memoir of the disintegration of a family set against the collapse of a country. But it is also a vivid portrait of the profound strength of the human spirit and the enduring power of love.
Where We Have Hope
Author: Andrew Meldrum
Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic
ISBN: 1555846904
Pages: 304
Year: 2007-12-01
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A journalist’s harrowing account of life in Zimbabwe—and the human rights atrocities perpetuated—under President Robert Mugabe’s despotic rule. Where We Have Hope is the gripping memoir of a young American journalist. In 1980, Andrew Meldrum arrived in a Zimbabwe flush with new independence, and he fell in love with the country and its optimism. But over the twenty years he lived there, Meldrum watched as President Robert Mugabe consolidated power and the government evolved into despotism. In May 2003, Meldrum, the last foreign journalist still working in the dangerous and chaotic nation, was illegally forced to leave his adopted home. Meldrum’s unflinching work describes the terror and intimidation Mugabe’s government exercised on both the press and citizens, and the resiliency of Zimbabweans determined to overturn Mugabe and demand the free society they were promised. “A remarkable odyssey . . . A compelling and, ultimately, heartbreaking story that demands to be read by anyone concerned with contemporary Africa.” —Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
The Fear
Author: Peter Godwin
Publisher: Little, Brown
ISBN: 0316123315
Pages: 400
Year: 2011-03-23
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Journalist Peter Godwin has covered wars. As a soldier, he's fought them. But nothing prepared him for the surreal mix of desperation and hope he encountered when he returned to Zimbabwe, his broken homeland. Godwin arrived as Robert Mugabe, the country's dictator for 30 years, has finally lost an election. Mugabe's tenure has left Zimbabwe with the world's highest rate of inflation and the shortest life span. Instead of conceding power, Mugabe launched a brutal campaign of terror against his own citizens. With foreign correspondents banned, and he himself there illegally, Godwin was one of the few observers to bear witness to this period the locals call The Fear. He saw torture bases and the burning villages but was most awed as an observer of not only simple acts of kindness but also churchmen and diplomats putting their own lives on the line to try to stop the carnage. THE FEAR is a book about the astonishing courage and resilience of a people, armed with nothing but a desire to be free, who challenged a violent dictatorship. It is also the deeply personal and ultimately uplifting story of a man trying to make sense of the country he can't recognize as home.
Casting with a Fragile Thread
Author: Wendy Kann
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 1466802111
Pages: 304
Year: 2007-04-17
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In this poignant, lyric memoir, a sister's tragic death prompts a woman's unbidden journey into her turbulent African past. A comfortable suburban housewife with three children living in Connecticut, Wendy Kann thought she had put her volatile childhood in colonial Rhodesia—now Zimbabwe—behind her. Then one Sunday morning came a terrible phone call: her youngest sister, Lauren, had been killed on a lonely road in Zambia. Suddenly unable to ignore her longing for her homeland, she decides she must confront the ghosts of her past. Wendy Kann's is a personal journey, set against a backdrop as exotic as it is desolate. From a privileged colonial childhood of mansions and servants, her story moves to a young adulthood marked by her father's death, her mother's insanity, and the viciousness of a bloody civil war. Through unlikely love she finds herself in the incongruous sophistication of Manhattan; three children bring the security of suburban America, until the heartbreaking vulnerability of the small child her sister left behind in Africa compels her to return to a continent she hardly recognizes. With honesty and compassion, Kann pieces together her sister's life, explores the heartbreak of loss and belonging, and finally discovers the true meaning of home.
Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness
Author: Alexandra Fuller
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101517700
Pages: 256
Year: 2011-08-23
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A story of survival and war, love and madness, loyalty and forgiveness, Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness is an intimate exploration of Fuller’s parents and of the price of being possessed by Africa’s uncompromising, fertile, death-dealing land. We follow Tim and Nicola Fuller hopscotching the continent, restlessly trying to establish a home. War, hardship, and tragedy follow the family even as Nicola fights to hold on to her children, her land, her sanity. But just when it seems that Nicola has been broken by the continent she loves, it is the African earth that revives and nurtures her. Cocktail Hour Under the Tree of Forgetfulness is Fuller at her very best.
House of Stone
Author: Christina Lamb
Publisher: Chicago Review Press
ISBN: 1556527357
Pages: 290
Year: 2007
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Describes the lives of two very different Zimbabweans--Nigel Hough, a wealthy white farmer, and Aqui, his poor black nanny--from the 1970s to 2002, focusing how both were affected by Zimbabwe's brutal civil war and its aftermath.
Mugabe and the White African
Author: Ben Freeth
Publisher: Lion Books
ISBN: 0745955460
Pages: 255
Year: 2011
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Ben Freeth has an extraordinary story to tell. Like that of many white farmers, his family's land was 'reclaimed' by Mugabe's government for redistribution. But Ben's family fought back. Appealing to international law, they instigated a suit against Mugabe's government via the SADC (The Southern African Development Community). The case was deferred time and again while Mugabe's men pulled strings. But after Freeth and his parents-in-law were abducted and beaten within inches of death in 2008, the SADC deemed any further delay to be an obstruction of justice. The case was heard, and successful on all counts. But the story doesn't end there. In 2009 the family farm was burnt to the ground. The fight for justice in Zimbabwe is far from over - this book is for anyone who wants to see into the heart of one of today's hardest places, and how human dignity flourishes even in the most adverse circumstances.
Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight
Author: Alexandra Fuller
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1588360490
Pages: 320
Year: 2002-03-05
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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A worthy heir to Isak Dinesen and Beryl Markham, Alexandra Fuller shares visceral memories of her childhood in Africa, and of her headstrong, unforgettable mother. “This is not a book you read just once, but a tale of terrible beauty to get lost in over and over.”—Newsweek “By turns mischievous and openhearted, earthy and soaring . . . hair-raising, horrific, and thrilling.”—The New Yorker Though it is a diary of an unruly life in an often inhospitable place, Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight is suffused with Fuller’s endearing ability to find laughter, even when there is little to celebrate. Fuller’s debut is unsentimental and unflinching but always captivating. In wry and sometimes hilarious prose, she stares down disaster and looks back with rage and love at the life of an extraordinary family in an extraordinary time. From 1972 to 1990, Alexandra Fuller—known to friends and family as Bobo—grew up on several farms in southern and central Africa. Her father joined up on the side of the white government in the Rhodesian civil war, and was often away fighting against the powerful black guerilla factions. Her mother, in turn, flung herself at their African life and its rugged farm work with the same passion and maniacal energy she brought to everything else. Though she loved her children, she was no hand-holder and had little tolerance for neediness. She nurtured her daughters in other ways: She taught them, by example, to be resilient and self-sufficient, to have strong wills and strong opinions, and to embrace life wholeheartedly, despite and because of difficult circumstances. And she instilled in Bobo, particularly, a love of reading and of storytelling that proved to be her salvation. Alexandra Fuller writes poignantly about a girl becoming a woman and a writer against a backdrop of unrest, not just in her country but in her home. But Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight is more than a survivor’s story. It is the story of one woman’s unbreakable bond with a continent and the people who inhabit it, a portrait lovingly realized and deeply felt. Praise for Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight “Riveting . . . [full of] humor and compassion.”—O: The Oprah Magazine “The incredible story of an incredible childhood.”—The Providence Journal
Letters from Wankie
Author: Patricia Friedberg
Publisher: Rainbow Books Incorporated
ISBN: 1568251653
Pages: 262
Year: 2013-07
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A nonfiction historical mid-fifties memoir about the colliery town with the unfortunate name of Wankie, in South Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe). Written by the then Clerk of the Court for the Native Commissioners Office from the hundreds of letters sent home to her family in London.
Once Upon a White Man
Author: Graham Atkins
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 1500906867
Pages: 256
Year: 2014-08-21
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From a colonial childhood, to the front-line of Rhodesia's vicious civil war, to the final disintegration of Mugabe's post-colonial Zimbabwe - this is the traumatic story of a conflicted young man who experiences the tragedy of his life and homeland being torn asunder. An honest and poignant insider's story which offers intriguing insights into the dilemma faced by patriotic white Africans trapped in the march of history... "A gripping love declaration to Africa. With the troubles of Rhodesia/Zimbabwe as background, the real protagonist of this book is Africa with all her wonders and horrors. Highly recommended for lovers of the continent, especially those longing for a well-balanced and honest account of recent African history" (review by Balazs Pataki, 2013). "The author remembers things that both racists and leftists would rather forget - the culture of humiliation and violence that made Rhodesia unsustainable, and the ugly silence of world opinion that made it possible for Mugabe to get away with genocide and ethnic cleansing. This book tore me from my political views and made me think seriously about the goals of humanity" (review by Avery Morrow, 2011)
Zimbabwe
Author: Philip Barclay
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 1408809788
Pages: 256
Year: 2011-06-20
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A fascinating travelogue and political expose of the scarred country of Zimbabwe. With a new postscript for the paperback edition.
Mukiwa
Author: Peter Godwin
Publisher: Macmillan _
ISBN: 0330339842
Pages: 417
Year: 1997
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This autobiography contains Peter Godwin's experiences of life in Rhodesia in the 1960s. At the age of 17 he was conscripted into the army, leading guerrillas in the bush. He studied law in England before returning to Zimbabwe.