Roaring Camp The Social World Of The California Gold Rush Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

Roaring Camp
Author: Susan Lee Johnson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393320995
Pages: 464
Year: 2000
View: 998
Read: 295
Captures the multiethnic, multicultural world of the California Gold Rush, in a richly textured social history that profiles the era's diverse and colorful characters, the evolution of a unique society, and the sources of our legends and myths about the Gold Rush. Reprint.
Roaring Camp
Author: Susan Lee Johnson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393048128
Pages: 464
Year: 2000
View: 899
Read: 569
Captures the multiethnic, multicultural world of the California Gold Rush, in a richly textured social history that profiles the era's diverse and colorful characters, the evolution of a unique society, the sources of our legends and myths about the Gold Rush.
Roaring Camp: The Social World of the California Gold Rush
Author: Susan Lee Johnson
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 039329207X
Pages: 464
Year: 2000-12-17
View: 1172
Read: 354
Winner of the 2001 Bancroft Prize. Historical insight is the alchemy that transforms the familiar story of the Gold Rush into something sparkling and new. The world of the Gold Rush that comes down to us through fiction and film—of unshaven men named Stumpy and Kentuck raising hell and panning for gold—is one of half-truths. In this brilliant work of social history, Susan Johnson enters the well-worked diggings of Gold Rush history and strikes a rich lode. She finds a dynamic social world in which the conventions of identity—ethnic, national, and sexual—were reshaped in surprising ways. She gives us the all-male households of the diggings, the mines where the men worked, and the fandango houses where they played. With a keen eye for character and story, Johnson restores the particular social world that issued in the Gold Rush myths we still cherish.
American Alchemy
Author: Brian Roberts
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 080786093X
Pages: 360
Year: 2003-06-19
View: 667
Read: 721
California during the gold rush was a place of disputed claims, shoot-outs, gambling halls, and prostitution; a place populated by that rough and rebellious figure, the forty-niner; in short, a place that seems utterly unconnected to middle-class culture. In American Alchemy, however, Brian Roberts offers a surprising challenge to this assumption. Roberts points to a long-neglected truth of the gold rush: many of the northeastern forty-niners who ventured westward were in fact middle-class in origin, status, and values. Tracing the experiences and adventures both of these men and of the "unseen" forty-niners--women who stayed back East while their husbands went out West--he shows that, whatever else the gold seekers abandoned on the road to California, they did not simply turn their backs on middle-class culture. Ultimately, Roberts argues, the story told here reveals an overlooked chapter in the history of the formation of the middle class. While the acquisition of respectability reflects one stage in this history, he says, the gold rush constitutes a second stage--a rebellion against standards of respectability.
Silver & Gold
Author: Drew Heath Johnson, Marcia Eymann
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN:
Pages: 226
Year: 1998
View: 461
Read: 1307
Photography in America was not even ten years old when gold was discovered at Sutter's Mill, and the rush of miners was followed by a rush of daguerreotype practitioners; both crafts evolved together in this remarkable time. Silver and Gold, the first book-length treatment of the earliest major historical phenomenon to be recorded by the camera lens, presents more than 150 extraordinary daguerreotypes and ambrotypes, many never before published. Silver and Gold includes works by Robert Vance, P.M. Batchelder, William Shew, Frederick Coombs, and W. H. Rulofson -- images of native Californians and those who migrated there to seek their fortunes in the gold fields. Photographs from the mining communities reflect the miners' rough houses, sunburned faces, and makeshift clothes, capturing the isolation and determination of people working under difficult conditions far from home. Essays by John Wood, poet and founding president of the Daguerreian Society; Peter Palmquist, independent scholar and curator in the field of photography; and Drew Johnson and Marcia Eymann, cocurators of the Oakland Museum exhibition that complements this volume, enhance these striking early images. In addition, annotations on the back of the photographs and written accounts of the experiences they record provide glimpses into the intentions of the photographers.
French San Francisco
Author: Claudine Chalmers
Publisher: Arcadia Publishing
ISBN: 0738555843
Pages: 128
Year: 2007
View: 402
Read: 1228
Nineteenth-century California was not a destination for the faint of heart, and Frenchmen are usually said to prefer their slippers to their traveling boots. Yet many visitors from France--starting in 1786 with legendary explorer Count de LapAA(c)rouse--made their way to the remote and beautiful territory, leaving enduring accounts and images of their experience. As France's troubled revolutionary era began in the 1840s, tens of thousands of Frenchmen journeyed to California's goldfields. Some found wealth, others freedom, and some death. Many remained in San Francisco, helping shape the city and make it French from the inside.
Re-Dressing America’s Frontier Past
Author: Peter Boag
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520274423
Pages: 270
Year: 2012-09
View: 838
Read: 1209
“An important, persuasive, and fascinating intervention in the literature on the American frontier." —Lisa Duggan, author of The Twilight of Equality? Neoliberalism, Cultural Politics, and the Attack on Democracy “Peter Boag's Re-dressing America's Frontier Past does just that: it re-imagines the American West as a place where cross-dressing is abundant and its meanings are as varied as the individuals themselves. Vividly written and broad in scope, Boag's compelling narrative debunks the gendered myths of the west and writes hundreds of stories back into history.” —Nan Alamilla Boyd, author of Wide-Open Town: A History of Queer San Francisco to 1965 “Peter Boag’s Re-Dressing America’s Frontier Past invites readers to reimagine fundamental ideas about sex, gender, and the history of the American West. Brilliant and perceptive, Boag rediscovers a past that once existed but that was forgotten as new ideas about sexuality emerged in the early twentieth century. Boag makes the lives of the West’s many cross-dressers central to his narrative, and the world they reveal gives us an opportunity to understand history in ways that are more comprehensive and humane. Boag's book sheds new light on the American frontier as well as the history of sex and gender.” —Albert Hurtado, author of Intimate Frontiers: Sex, Gender, and Culture in Old California “Peter Boag uncovers the rich and heretofore hidden history of cross dressers with wit and wisdom, humor and humanity. He adds another crucial layer to our understanding of the West's complicated gendered past and in the process demolishes the region's mythical identity as a virile, white, masculine, heterosexual frontier. The book illuminates the sources of that limited view and liberates us from it.” —Sherry L. Smith, author of Reimaging Indians: Native Americans Through Anglo Eyes, 1880-1940 “A fascinating excursion into a side of western life rarely acknowledged today but surprisingly open and remarked upon at the time. Boag's thoughts on the reasons for the historical blurring are as provocative as his stories are intriguing and often poignant.” —Elliott West, author of The Last Indian War: The Nez Perce Story “This book by the foremost historian of sexuality in the American West is a classic before its time. The history of Westerns cross-dressing is placed within numerous historical contexts, deeply researched, and presented with multiple nuances and thorough analysis. At the same time, we learn of the personal, of the many people who might never have had their significant stories. A stellar and stunning work!” —John R. Wunder, author of “Writing of Race, Class, Gender, and Power in the American West” in North America: Tensions and (Re)Solutions “Original and provocative—Boag finds ample evidence of women and men in western towns and cities who challenged familiar binaries of heteronormative manhood and womanhood through cross-dressing, same-sex intimacy, and trans-gendered identities. But the real story is how communities made meaning of these identities. Boag links sexologists’ promotion of heteronormativity with notions of a redemptive frontier, anti-modernism, and national identity. The results are entirely new perspectives on the imagined West and its place in American history.” —Dee Garceau-Hagen, editor of Across the Great Divide: Cultures of Manhood in the American West
Rush to Gold
Author: Malcolm J. Rohrbough
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 030018140X
Pages: 342
Year: 2013-07-23
View: 594
Read: 581
The California Gold Rush attracted 300,000 gold seekers in the mid-1800s, and it is the story of 30,000 Frenchman who came by sea that is told in The Rush to Gold. This is the first book to give an international focus to this pivotal time.
River of Hope
Author: Omar S. Valerio-Jiménez
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822351854
Pages: 384
Year: 2013-01-16
View: 772
Read: 934
In River of Hope, Omar S. Valerio-Jiménez examines state formation, cultural change, and the construction of identity in the lower Rio Grande region during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He chronicles a history of violence resulting from multiple conquests, of resistance and accommodation to state power, and of changing ethnic and political identities. The redrawing of borders neither began nor ended the region's long history of unequal power relations. Nor did it lead residents to adopt singular colonial or national identities. Instead, their regionalism, transnational cultural practices, and kinship ties subverted state attempts to control and divide the population. Diverse influences transformed the borderlands as Spain, Mexico, and the United States competed for control of the region. Indian slaves joined Spanish society; Mexicans allied with Indians to defend river communities; Anglo Americans and Mexicans intermarried and collaborated; and women sued to confront spousal abuse and to secure divorces. Drawn into multiple conflicts along the border, Mexican nationals and Mexican Texans (tejanos) took advantage of their transnational social relations and ambiguous citizenship to escape criminal prosecution, secure political refuge, and obtain economic opportunities. To confront the racialization of their cultural practices and their increasing criminalization, tejanos claimed citizenship rights within the United States and, in the process, created a new identity. Published in cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University.
John Sutter
Author: Albert L. Hurtado
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 080613772X
Pages: 412
Year: 2006
View: 225
Read: 510
Re-examines the life of John Sutter in the context of America's rush for westward expansion in a fully documented account of the Swiss expatriate and would-be empire builder and his times.
Civilizing Women
Author: Janice Boddy
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691186510
Pages:
Year: 2018-06-05
View: 281
Read: 1151

Metropolis in the Making
Author: Tom Sitton, William Francis Deverell
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520226275
Pages: 371
Year: 2001
View: 567
Read: 238
"Informed by the rich new literature on contemporary Los Angeles, Metropolis in the Making takes giant strides in illuminating the history of the present. Looking back to the future, this rich collection of historical essays fixes on the key formative moments of America's first decentralized industrial metropolis. Not only would Carey McWilliams be pleased, but so too will be every contemporary urbanist."--Edward W. Soja, author of Postmetropolis: Critical Studies of Cities and Regions and co-editor of The City: Los Angeles and Urban Theory at the End of the Twentieth Century
Caballero
Author: Jovita González, Jovita González Mireles, Eve Raleigh
Publisher: Texas A&M University Press
ISBN: 0890967008
Pages: 350
Year: 1996
View: 654
Read: 1203
Jovita Gonzalez and Eve Raleigh's Caballero: A Historical Novel, a milestone in Mexican-American and Texas literature written during the 1930s and 1940s, centers on a mid-nineteenth-century Mexican landowner and his family living in the heart of southern Texas during a time of tumultuous change. After covering the American military occupation of South Texas, the story involves the reader in romances between two young lovers from opposing sides during the military conflict of the U.S.-Mexico War. Caballero's young protagonists fall in love but face struggles with race, class, gender and sexual contradictions. An introduction by Jose E. Limon, epilogue by Maria Cotera, and foreword by Thomas H. Kreneck offer a clear picture of the importance of the work to the study of Mexican-American and Texas history and to the feminist critique of culture. This work, long lost in a collection of private papers and unavailable until now, serves as a literary ethnography of South Texas-Mexican folklore customs and traditions.
History and Social Theory
Author: Peter Burke
Publisher: Polity
ISBN: 0745634079
Pages: 224
Year: 2005
View: 1041
Read: 631
What is the use of social theory to historians, and of history to social theorists? In clear and energetic prose, a pre–eminent cultural historian here offers a far–reaching response to these deceptively simple questions. In this classic text, now revised and updated in its second edition, Peter Burke reviews afresh the relationship between the fields of history and the social sciences and their tentative convergence in recent decades. Burke first examines what uses historians have made – or might make – of the models, methods, and concepts of the social sciences, and then analyzes some of the intellectual conflicts, such as the opposition between structure and human agency, which are at the heart of the tension between history and social theory. Throughout, he draws from a broad range of cultures and periods to illustrate how history, in turn, has been used to create and validate social theories. This new edition brings the book up to date with the addition of examples and discussions of new topics such as social capital, globalization and post–colonialism. The second edition of History and Social Theory will continue to stimulate both students and scholars across a range of disciplines with its challenging assessment of the roles of history and social science today.
Black San Francisco
Author: Albert S. Broussard
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages: 323
Year: 1993
View: 974
Read: 253
When it came to racial equality in the early twentieth century, Albert S. Broussard argues, the liberal, progressive image of San Francisco was largely a facade. In this book, he challenges the rhetoric of progress and opportunity with evidence of the reality of inequality and shows how black San Franciscans struggled for equality in the same manner as their counterparts in the Midwest and East. Understanding the texture of the racial caste system in the city prior to 1954, he contends, is critical to understanding why blacks made so little progress in employment, housing, and politics despite the absence of segregation laws. Reconstructing the plight of San Francisco's black citizens, Broussard reveals a population that, despite its small size before 1940, did not accept second-class citizenship passively yet remained nonviolent into the 1960s. He also shows how World War II and the defense industry brought thousands of southern black migrants to the bay area. Ultimately, he demonstrates, these newcomers and native black residents formed coalitions with white liberals to attack racial inequality more vigorously and successfully than at any previous time in San Francisco's history.