History Of Britain In Maps Over 9 Maps Of Our Nation Through Time Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

A History of Britain in 12 Maps
Author: Philip Parker
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0241368286
Pages: 320
Year: 2019-05-30
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A fascinating analysis of a dozen maps from critical points in British history over the last two thousand years, from the Celtic period when 'Britain' was just a patchwork of tribal kingdoms, to a century ago when the whole of Ireland, India, Australia, much of Africa, Asia and the Americas were marked as British. Charting the assembling and disassembling of regions under British rule, this book features maps that teach us about the political, cultural evolution of the nation, and much of our past that we often forget. With current borders being disputed and, with them, identities challenged, this book will provide a reassuring insight into how our country's borders have always been, and always will be, in a state of flux.
Map of a Nation
Author: Rachel Hewitt
Publisher: Granta Books
ISBN: 1847084524
Pages: 432
Year: 2011-07-07
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Map of a Nation tells the story of the creation of the Ordnance Survey map – the first complete, accurate, affordable map of the British Isles. The Ordnance Survey is a much beloved British institution, and Map of a Nation is, amazingly, the first popular history to tell the story of the map and the men who dreamt and delivered it. The Ordnance Survey’s history is one of political revolutions, rebellions and regional unions that altered the shape and identity of the United Kingdom over the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. It’s also a deliciously readable account of one of the great untold British adventure stories, featuring intrepid individuals lugging brass theodolites up mountains to make the country visible to itself for the first time.
Roman Britain
Author:
Publisher:
ISBN:
Pages:
Year: 1978
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Prisoners of Geography
Author: Tim Marshall
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501121472
Pages: 320
Year: 2016-10-11
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First published in Great Britain in 2015 by Elliott and Thompson Limited.
Great Maps
Author: Jerry Brotton
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1465435611
Pages: 256
Year: 2014-09-01
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Great Maps takes a close look at the history of maps, from ancient maps such as medieval mappa mundi to Google Earth. The latest in a lavishly illustrated DK series about masterpieces, this fascinating book tells the stories behind great maps and reveals how they have helped people to make sense of their world.
All Over the Map
Author: Betty Mason, Greg Miller
Publisher: National Geographic
ISBN: 1426219725
Pages: 320
Year: 2018-10-30
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Created for map lovers by map lovers, this rich book explores the intriguing stories behind maps across history and illuminates how the art of cartography thrives today. In this visually stunning book, award-winning journalists Betsy Mason and Greg Miller--authors of the National Geographic cartography blog "All Over the Map"--explore the intriguing stories behind maps from a wide variety of cultures, civilizations, and time periods. Based on interviews with scores of leading cartographers, curators, historians, and scholars, this is a remarkable selection of fascinating and unusual maps. This diverse compendium includes ancient maps of dragon-filled seas, elaborate graphics picturing unseen concepts and forces from inside Earth to outer space, devious maps created by spies, and maps from pop culture such as the schematics to the Death Star and a map of Westeros from Game of Thrones. If your brain craves maps--and Mason and Miller would say it does, whether you know it or not--this eye-opening visual feast will inspire and delight.
The Phantom Atlas
Author: Edward Brooke-Hitching
Publisher: Chronicle Books
ISBN: 145216844X
Pages: 256
Year: 2018-04-03
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The Phantom Atlas is a guide to the world not as it is, but as it was imagined to be. It's a world of ghost islands, invisible mountain ranges, mythical civilizations, ship-wrecking beasts, and other fictitious features introduced on maps and atlases through mistakes, misunderstanding, fantasies, and outright lies. This richly illustrated book collects and explores the colorful histories behind a striking range of real antique maps that are all in some way a little too good to be true. Author Edward Brooke-Hitching investigates the places where exploration and mythology meet, using gorgeous atlas images as springboards for tales of the deranged buccaneers, seafaring monks, heroes, swindlers, and other amazing stories behind cartography's greatest phantoms.
The New Map of Empire
Author: S. Max Edelson
Publisher:
ISBN: 0674972112
Pages: 464
Year: 2017
View: 409
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After the Treaty of Paris ended the Seven Years' War in 1763, British America stretched from Hudson Bay to the Florida Keys, from the Atlantic coast to the Mississippi River, and across new islands in the West Indies. To better rule these vast dominions, Britain set out to map its new territories with unprecedented rigor and precision. Max Edelson's The New Map of Empire pictures the contested geography of the British Atlantic world and offers new explanations of the causes and consequences of Britain's imperial ambitions in the generation before the American Revolution. Under orders from King George III to reform the colonies, the Board of Trade dispatched surveyors to map far-flung frontiers, chart coastlines in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, sound Florida's rivers, parcel tropical islands into plantation tracts, and mark boundaries with indigenous nations across the continental interior. Scaled to military standards of resolution, the maps they produced sought to capture the essential attributes of colonial spaces-their natural capacities for agriculture, navigation, and commerce-and give British officials the knowledge they needed to take command over colonization from across the Atlantic. Britain's vision of imperial control threatened to displace colonists as meaningful agents of empire and diminished what they viewed as their greatest historical accomplishment: settling the New World. As London's mapmakers published these images of order in breathtaking American atlases, Continental and British forces were already engaged in a violent contest over who would control the real spaces they represented. Accompanying Edelson's innovative spatial history of British America are online visualizations of more than 250 original maps, plans, and charts.
American Nations
Author: Colin Woodard
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101544457
Pages: 384
Year: 2011-09-29
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An illuminating history of North America's eleven rival cultural regions that explodes the red state-blue state myth. North America was settled by people with distinct religious, political, and ethnographic characteristics, creating regional cultures that have been at odds with one another ever since. Subsequent immigrants didn't confront or assimilate into an “American” or “Canadian” culture, but rather into one of the eleven distinct regional ones that spread over the continent each staking out mutually exclusive territory. In American Nations, Colin Woodard leads us on a journey through the history of our fractured continent, and the rivalries and alliances between its component nations, which conform to neither state nor international boundaries. He illustrates and explains why “American” values vary sharply from one region to another. Woodard (author of American Character: A History of the Epic Struggle Between Individual Liberty and the Common Good) reveals how intranational differences have played a pivotal role at every point in the continent's history, from the American Revolution and the Civil War to the tumultuous sixties and the "blue county/red county" maps of recent presidential elections. American Nations is a revolutionary and revelatory take on America's myriad identities and how the conflicts between them have shaped our past and are molding our future. From the Hardcover edition.
Britain's Tudor Maps
Author: John Speed
Publisher: Batsford
ISBN: 1849943842
Pages: 160
Year: 2016-10-13
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A stunning new edition of the earliest atlas of the British Isles. Britain’s Tudor Maps: County by County reproduces the maps of John Speed’s 1611 collection The Theatre of Great Britaine in large, easy-to-read format for the first time. Compiled from 1596, these richly detailed maps show each county of Great Britain individually and as they existed at the time, complete with a wealth of heraldic decoration, illustrations and royal portraits. With an introduction by the bestselling author Nigel Nicholson, each map is presented alongside a fascinating commentary by Alasdair Hawkyard, elaborating on both the topographical features and the social conditions of each county at the time, enabling an examination of how the physical and social landscape has been transformed over time.
The Red Atlas
Author: John Davies, Alexander J. Kent
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022638960X
Pages: 272
Year: 2017-10-17
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Nearly thirty years after the end of the Cold War, its legacy and the accompanying Russian-American tension continues to loom large. Russia’s access to detailed information on the United States and its allies may not seem so shocking in this day of data clouds and leaks, but long before we had satellite imagery of any neighborhood at a finger’s reach, the amount the Soviet government knew about your family’s city, street, and even your home would astonish you. Revealing how this was possible, The Red Atlas is the never-before-told story of the most comprehensive mapping endeavor in history and the surprising maps that resulted. From 1950 to 1990, the Soviet Army conducted a global topographic mapping program, creating large-scale maps for much of the world that included a diversity of detail that would have supported a full range of military planning. For big cities like New York, DC, and London to towns like Pontiac, MI and Galveston, TX, the Soviets gathered enough information to create street-level maps. What they chose to include on these maps can seem obvious like locations of factories and ports, or more surprising, such as building heights, road widths, and bridge capacities. Some of the detail suggests early satellite technology, while other specifics, like detailed depictions of depths and channels around rivers and harbors, could only have been gained by actual Soviet feet on the ground. The Red Atlas includes over 350 extracts from these incredible Cold War maps, exploring their provenance and cartographic techniques as well as what they can tell us about their makers and the Soviet initiatives that were going on all around us. A fantastic historical document of an era that sometimes seems less distant, The Red Atlas offers an uncanny view of the world through the eyes of Soviet strategists and spies.
A History of the World in 12 Maps
Author: Jerry Brotton
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143126024
Pages: 544
Year: 2014
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An engaging survey of 12 maps from Ancient Greece to Google Earth examines how they have had a profound influence on how the world is seen, revealing how historical geographical depictions were subject to deliberate manipulations to promote a range of special interests. 30,000 first printing.
Maps for Family and Local History (2nd Edition)
Author: William Foot, Geraldine Beech, Rose Mitchell
Publisher: Dundurn
ISBN: 1554882230
Pages: 112
Year: 2004-04-01
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Maps for Family and Local History shows how three great land surveys can provide information on ancestral homes, as well as fascinating historical snapshots of specific areas. Covering 1836 to 1943, the Tithe, Valuation Office, and National Farm Surveys provide a wealth of information on rural and urban localities, on dwellings, settlements, and landscapes as well as the status of householders. The text gives the rationale behind the surveys and covers each in detail. Fully updated by map experts from The National Archives, this illustrated guide is the perfect companion to researching those maps.
Maps That Changed The World
Author: John O. E. Clark
Publisher: Batsford
ISBN: 1849942978
Pages: 256
Year: 2016-02-11
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An ancient Chinese proverb suggests, “They are wise parents who give their children roots and wings – and a map.” Maps That Changed the World features some of the world's most famous maps, stretching back to a time when cartography was in its infancy and the 'edge of the world' was a barrier to exploration. The book includes details of how the Lewis and Clark Expedition helped map the American West, and how the British mapped India and Australia. Included are the beautifully engraved Dutch maps of the 16th century; the sinister Utopian maps of the Nazis; the maps that presaged brilliant military campaigns; charted the geology of a nation; and the ones that divided a continent up between its European conquerors. Organised by theme, the book shows the evolution of map-making from all corners of the globe, from ancient clay maps, to cartographic breakthroughs such as Harry Beck’s map of the London underground. There are also famous fictional maps, including the maps of the lost continent of Atlantis and Tolkien’s Middle Earth. With an introduction written by acclaimed cartographic historian Jeremy Black.
Maps and the 20th Century
Author: Tom Harper
Publisher:
ISBN: 0712356614
Pages: 272
Year: 2016-11-01
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