From Defender To Critic The Search For A New Jewish Self Book PDF, EPUB Download & Read Online Free

From Defender to Critic
Author: David Hartman
Publisher: Jewish Lights Publishing
ISBN: 1580235158
Pages: 303
Year: 2012
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David Hartman, the world's leading modern Orthodox theologian, presents his own painful spiritual evolution from defender of the rule-based system of Jewish law to revolutionary proponent of a theology of empowerment, one that encourages individuals and communities to take greater levels of responsibility for their religious lives.
Relational Judaism
Author: Ron Wolfson
Publisher: Jewish Lights Publishing
ISBN: 1580236669
Pages: 262
Year: 2013
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Noted educator and community revitalization pioneer Dr. Ron Wolfson presents practical strategies and case studies to guide Jewish leaders in turning institutions into engaging communities that connect members to Judaism in meaningful and lasting ways.
Jewish Theology in Our Time
Author: Elliot J. Cosgrove
Publisher: Jewish Lights Publishing
ISBN: 1580236308
Pages: 202
Year: 2012-12
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A powerful and challenging examination of what Jews believe today¿ by a new generation¿s dynamic and innovative thinkers. New in Paperback! At every critical juncture in Jewish history, Jews have understood a dynamic theology to be essential for a vital Jewish community. This important collection sets the next stage of Jewish theological thought, bringing together a cross section of interesting new voices from all movements in Judaism to inspire and stimulate discussion now and in the years to come. Provocative and wide-ranging, these invigorating and creative insights from a new generation¿s thought leaders provide a coherent and inspiring picture of Jewish belief in our time. The passionate voices of a new generation of Jewish thinkers continue the dialogue with God, examining the dynamics of what Jews can believe today. They explore: ¿ A dynamic God in process ¿ The canon of Jewish literature and its potential to be both contemporary and authentic to tradition ¿ Critical terms and categories for discussing Jewish theology ¿ The ongoing nature of the Jewish search for God ¿ Ruptures within the modern Jewish condition ¿ And much more
Revolution of Jewish Spirit
Author: Baruch HaLevi, Ellen Frankel, Ron Wolfson, Dr.
Publisher: Jewish Lights Publishing
ISBN: 1580236251
Pages: 187
Year: 2012
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A practical and engaging guide to reinvigorating Jewish community life, with strategies for reviving the Jewish spiritual centers at the heart of Jewish tradition and tips on sustainable transformation, inspiring leadership and inviting sacred spaces.
Reimagining Leadership in Jewish Organizations
Author: Misha Galperin, Dr., Misha Galperin, Larry S. Moses
Publisher: Jewish Lights Publishing
ISBN: 1580234925
Pages: 154
Year: 2012
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Provides inspiring, action-oriented advice and examples that illustrate how you can help cultivate strong, effective and transformative leadership that will help your organization achieve its goals.
The God Who Hates Lies
Author: Dr. David Hartman, Charlie Buckholtz
Publisher: Jewish Lights Publishing
ISBN: 1580237908
Pages: 208
Year: 2014-02-01
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Covenant & Conscience—A Groundbreaking Journey to the Heart of Halakha—new in paperback! “Anyone curious about the Jewish way of life, yet dissatisfied with much of contemporary Jewish theology and practice—repelled, perhaps, by the cheap and vulgar apologetics of those who seek to justify and sustain some of the tradition’s systematic immoralities, who smugly deny expression to any doubt or uncertainty, claiming a monopoly on absolute truth—is invited to join me on this pilgrimage.” —from the Introduction In this deeply personal look at the struggle between commitment to Jewish religious tradition and personal morality, Dr. David Hartman, the world’s leading Modern Orthodox Jewish theologian, probes the deepest questions at the heart of what it means to be a human being and a Jew. Dr. Hartman draws on a lifetime of learning, teaching and experience as a social activist to present an intellectual framework for examining covenantal theology as it is applied to religious life. As much an expression of his impassioned commitment to Jewish law as it is testament to a lifetime of intellectual questioning and courage, this bold examination of the halakhic system offers fresh insights into Judaism and the quest for spiritual nourishment.
A heart of many rooms
Author: David Hartman
Publisher: Jewish Lights Pub
ISBN:
Pages: 298
Year: 1999-09-01
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In this collection of powerful essays, Dr. Hartman looks with a clear, scholarly, yet passionate eye on the spiritual and theological questions that face all Jews and all religious persons in our day.
Defenders of the Faith
Author: Samuel C. Heilman
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520221125
Pages: 400
Year: 1992
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"An indispensable sociological and anthropological account of an important religious group within Israel. . . . Heilman combines his own detailed observations within a cautious and critical sociological framework."--Calvin Goldscheider, Brown University
Maimonides and the Book That Changed Judaism
Author: Micah Goodman
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0827611986
Pages: 274
Year: 2015
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A publishing sensation long at the top of the best-seller lists in Israel, the original Hebrew edition of Maimonides and the Book That Changed Judaism has been called the most successful book ever published in Israel on the preeminent medieval Jewish thinker Moses Maimonides. The works of Maimonides, particularly The Guide for the Perplexed, are reckoned among the fundamental texts that influenced all subsequent Jewish philosophy and also proved to be highly influential in Christian and Islamic thought. Spanning subjects ranging from God, prophecy, miracles, revelation, and evil, to politics, messianism, reason in religion, and the therapeutic role of doubt, Maimonides and the Book That Changed Judaism elucidates the complex ideas of The Guide in remarkably clear and engaging prose. Drawing on his own experience as a central figure in the current Israeli renaissance of Jewish culture and spirituality, Micah Goodman brings Maimonides’s masterwork into dialogue with the intellectual and spiritual worlds of twenty-first-century readers. Goodman contends that in Maimonides’s view, the Torah’s purpose is not to bring clarity about God but rather to make us realize that we do not understand God at all; not to resolve inscrutable religious issues but to give us insight into the true nature and purpose of our lives.
My Father's Paradise
Author: Ariel Sabar
Publisher: Algonquin Books
ISBN: 1565129962
Pages: 345
Year: 2009-10-13
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In a remote corner of the world, forgotten for nearly three thousand years, lived an enclave of Kurdish Jews so isolated that they still spoke Aramaic, the language of Jesus. Mostly illiterate, they were self-made mystics and gifted storytellers and humble peddlers who dwelt in harmony with their Muslim and Christian neighbors in the mountains of northern Iraq. To these descendants of the Lost Tribes of Israel, Yona Sabar was born. Yona's son Ariel grew up in Los Angeles, where Yona had become an esteemed professor, dedicating his career to preserving his people’s traditions. Ariel wanted nothing to do with his father’s strange immigrant heritage—until he had a son of his own. Ariel Sabar brings to life the ancient town of Zakho, discovering his family’s place in the sweeping saga of Middle-Eastern history. This powerful book is an improbable story of tolerance and hope set in what today is the very center of the world’s attention.
A Living Covenant
Author: David Hartman
Publisher: Jewish Lights Publishing
ISBN: 1580230113
Pages: 340
Year: 1985
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"'A covenantal vision of life, with mitzvah (divine commandment) as the central organizing principle in the relationship between Jews and God, liberates the intellect and the moral will. I seek to show that a tradition mediated by the Sinai covenant can encourage the development of a human being who is not afraid to assume responsibility for the ongoing drama of Jewish history. Passive resignation is seen not to be an essential trait of one whose relationship to God is mediated by the hearing of mitzvot." --from the Introduction This interpretation of Jewish teaching will appeal to all people seeking to understand the relationship between the idea of divine demand and the human response, between religious tradition and modernity. Hartman shows that a life lived in Jewish tradition need not be passive, insulated, or self-effacing, but can be lived in the modern pluralistic world with passion, tolerance, and spontaneity. The Judaic tradition is often seen as being more concerned with uncritical obedience to law than with individual freedom and responsibility. In A Living Covenant, Hartman challenges this approach by revealing a Judaism grounded in a covenant--a relational framework--informed by the metaphor of marital love rather than that of parent-child dependency. This view of life places the individual firmly within community. Hartman shows that the Judaic tradition need not be understood in terms of human passivity and resignation, but rather as a vehicle by which human individuality and freedom can be expressed within a relational matrix.
The Jewish Divide Over Israel
Author: Edward Alexander, Paul Bogdanor
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
ISBN: 0765803275
Pages: 283
Year: 2006
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Before 1967, Israel had the overwhelming support of world opinion. So long as Israel's existence was in harmony with politically correct assumptions, it was supported, or at least accepted, by the majority of "progressive" Jews, especially in the wake of the Holocaust. This is no longer the case. The Jewish Divide Over Israel explains the role played by prominent Jews in turning Israel into an isolated pariah nation. After their catastrophic defeat in 1967, Arabs overcame inferiority on the battlefield with superiority in the war of ideas. Their propaganda stopped trumpeting their desire to eradicate Israel. Instead, in a calculated appeal to liberals and radicals, they redefined their war of aggression against the Jews as a struggle for the liberation of Palestinian Arabs. The tenacity of Arabs' rejection of Israel and their relentless campaign--in schools, universities, churches, professional organizations, and, above all, the news media--to destroy Israel's moral image had the desired impact. Many Jewish liberals became desperate to escape from the shadow of Israel's alleged misdeeds and found a way to do so by joining other members of the left in blaming Israeli sins for Arab violence. Today, Jewish liberals rationalize violence against the innocent as resistance to the oppressor, excuse Arab extremism as the frustration of a wronged party, and redefine eliminationist rhetoric and physical assaults on Jews as "criticism of Israeli policy." Israel's Jewish accusers have played a crucial and disproportionate role in the current upsurge of antisemitism precisely because they speak as Jews. The essays in this book seek to understand and throw back the assault on Israel led by such Jewish liberals and radicals as Tony Judt, Noam Chomsky, George Steiner, Daniel Boyarin, Marc Ellis, Israel Shahak, and many others. Its writers demonstrate that the foundation of the state of Israel, far from being the primal sin alleged by its accusers, was one of the few redeeming events in a century of blood and shame.
Love and Terror in the God Encounter
Author: David Hartman
Publisher: Jewish Lights Publishing
ISBN: 1580231764
Pages: 219
Year: 2004
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Examines the philosophy of one of the 20th century's leading Jewish Talmudists, who stressed halakhah (Jewish law) as a means of gaining mastery over one's own nature, and of drawing closer to God.
Jews and Power
Author: Ruth R. Wisse
Publisher: Schocken
ISBN: 0307533131
Pages: 256
Year: 2008-12-24
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Part of the Jewish Encounter series Taking in everything from the Kingdom of David to the Oslo Accords, Ruth Wisse offers a radical new way to think about the Jewish relationship to power. Traditional Jews believed that upholding the covenant with God constituted a treaty with the most powerful force in the universe; this later transformed itself into a belief that, unburdened by a military, Jews could pursue their religious mission on a purely moral plain. Wisse, an eminent professor of comparative literature at Harvard, demonstrates how Jewish political weakness both increased Jewish vulnerability to scapegoating and violence, and unwittingly goaded power-seeking nations to cast Jews as perpetual targets. Although she sees hope in the State of Israel, Wisse questions the way the strategies of the Diaspora continue to drive the Jewish state, echoing Abba Eban's observation that Israel was the only nation to win a war and then sue for peace. And then she draws a persuasive parallel to the United States today, as it struggles to figure out how a liberal democracy can face off against enemies who view Western morality as weakness. This deeply provocative book is sure to stir debate both inside and outside the Jewish world. Wisse's narrative offers a compelling argument that is rich with history and bristling with contemporary urgency. From the Hardcover edition.
Pius XII and the Holocaust
Author: José M. Sánchez
Publisher: CUA Press
ISBN: 0813210801
Pages: 197
Year: 2002-01
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In this highly accessible work, José M. Sánchez offers a new approach to the controversy.